Title 1 Plan

Municipal Elementary Title I plan 2018-2019

School Name: Municipal Elementary

LEA Name: Kevin Chase

Name

Title I planning team

Signature

Kevin Chase

Principal

 

Kristi Cool

Faculty Member

 

Cara Dayley

Faculty Member

 

Jacci Strain

Faculty Member

 

Holly Casebolt

Paraprofessional

 

Claire Crouch

Parent

 

Mary Burrell

Parent

 

Kaylene Robinson

Parent

 
     

Developing the Title I schoolwide plan: Schoolwide plans are developed with the involvement of parents and other members of the community to be served and individuals who will carry out such plans.

Title I Director      Lori Jo Rasmussen   Signature                                                                                                                               

A comprehensive Title I schoolwide plan is designed to assist students in meeting Utah State Standards and guides ongoing systematic improvement. The Every Student Succeeds Act includes four required components for schoolwide plans . The plan contains four components with reform strategies to help improve student outcomes.  These include: (1) A Comprehensive Needs Assessment, (2) Schoolwide Reform Strategies, (3) Activities to Ensure Mastery, and (4) Coordination and Integration. We will use the Plan, Do, Study, Act improvement cycle to improve our school.

  1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment:

Schools implementing a schoolwide Title I program must conduct a comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school. The needs assessment takes into account information on the academic achievement on the State’s standards, particularly the needs of children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing to meet the standards and any other factors set by the LEA.

The needs assessment should involve multiple stakeholders to get an accurate picture of strengths and weaknesses of the school that affect student performance. The needs assessment also looks at the needs of the entire school program. All students benefit from a Title I schoolwide

program; however, schools should emphasize implementing strategies that help struggling learners.  

Municipal Elementary is drawing information from multiple sources through a variety of assessments in order to evaluate all students’ performance in relation to the Common Core State Standards.  With the new standards for “Utah Comprehensive Accountability System” we will be evaluating our student’s performance in all categories. The needs and strengths of Municipal will be identified throughout this document.

The Utah RISE test (Readiness Improvement Success Empowerment:  Results for grades 3-6 in Reading and Math tests are used to evaluate summative student progress.

Dynamic Indicator of Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS): Students in grades K-3 will be administered the DIBELS test three times annually to assess their reading skills growth.

Imagine Learning Math Facts -Fluency:Students in grades K-6 will be given a pre-assessment and then working skills that need to be strengthened with their math facts.  At the end of the year we will have a report on how much each student has progressed.

SAGE benchmark tests and Weber School District SGA tests (Reading, Math, Science):Will be used by teachers in a formative method to impact teaching and remediation.

Municipal Needs Assessment Survey:Parents were invited to give feedback about Municipal Elementary through an anonymous Google form.  This survey asked their view and perspective of teacher effectiveness, curriculum instruction, student growth, effectiveness of support staff, communication preferences, and one open ended question about what changes are needed at Municipal Elementary.

Demographic data

(Population, Poverty, Ethnicity, Migration)

Asian: 6; Black: 7; Hispanic: 84; Am Indian: 5; Pacific Isl. 9; White: 270; Total 381

Poverty rate 53%; Migration 14.78%

School climate (including safe school

data)

The faculty at Municipal works hard to insure a positive climate for students.  Behavior concerns are tackled with a multi-pronged approach utilizing the strengths of the counselor, the Title I coordinator and the principal to address the root of problems.  Teachers are very supportive and parents are involved in decisions on how to proceed.

Number of students suspended for safe school issues: 0

School Culture:

"School culture is the set of norms, values and beliefs, rituals and ceremonies, symbols and stories that make up the 'persona' of the school,"

-Dr. Kent D. Peterson,  professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Municipal has a proud history of supporting students.  We are dedicated to discovering which students are understanding the Essential Learning Targets in CORE concepts and working in a Tier 2 or Tier 3 interventions for those who didn’t understand.

We are working as an MTSS school to create a positive environment for students where they are recognized daily in the classroom using SOAR tickets to promote positive behaviors. We recognize them weekly at a school level where the students can turn in the SOAR tickets for prizes. Monthly we plan recognition assemblies to inspire good behavior, attendance, and citizenship in the school.

Our school’s initials are M.E. and we have decided to promote the Power in M.E. Our PTA is going to purchase a school shirt for every child and have school pride days on Friday where everyone in the school is encouraged to wear their shirt.

Family engagement in schools is a shared responsibility in which schools and other community agencies and organizations are committed to reaching out to engage parents in meaningful ways, and the parents are committed to actively supporting their children's and adolescents' learning and development.

To engage families in understanding what happens at school, we promote communication through our web page that is updated weekly, a marquee that is viewed by all parents who bring students to school, monthly email messages, monthly PTA newsletters, and the Fabulous Friday Phone Calls where the principal calls the home of one student per class and lets the parent know what great things the student is doing. This call allows the class to celebrate the awesome student, and allows the parent to participate in their success.

To actively involve families in the school setting, parents are invited to attend individual conferences for their child three scheduled times per year and as otherwise needed. We also have one night a year to emphasize Math, Science and Technology at the school where families can come and enjoy hands on projects, activities, and problem solving with their children.  On a different night of the year we also celebrate literacy and provide activities to promote reading, writing, comprehension, and a love for books. These activities are well attended and anticipated by families and students alike.

We have a theater club that all fourth through sixth grade students can participate in.  They prepare a yearly play to put on for the community. We have a sell out crowd every night the play is put on.

Our community supports our families by providing school supplies, shoes, and meal packs for children in need of these items.

Teacher qualifications

20 of the 21 teachers at Municipal Elementary are highly qualified.  Each of those 20 teachers has a Bachelor’s degree and is certified by the State of Utah, which meets the requirements under section 1119.  One teacher is under the APT program and if she continues at her current rate will be Highly Qualified by the end of next year. Nine out of twenty-one teachers have their Master Degrees, four teachers have an ESL endorsement, and four have a reading endorsement. Two teachers are provisional in their first three years of teaching.  All paraprofessionals have met the highly qualified requirements. All paraprofessionals are under the direct supervision of a certified teacher and the principal. Paraprofessionals are receiving regular in-service

Data Analysis summary

END-OF-YEAR SAGE RESULTS Municipal 2017-2018

GRADE

LANGUAGE ARTS

MATH

 

% students proficient

% students proficient

3rd

21%

33%

4th

14 %

25 %

5th

26%

24%

6th

24%

24%

END-OF-YEAR WEBER SCHOOL DISTRICT RESULTS 2017-2018

GRADE

LANGUAGE ARTS

MATH

 

% students proficient

% students proficient

3rd

43.7%

50.2%

4th

39%

48.9%

5th

41.3%

47.8%

6th

44.4%

40.2%

DIBELS:

        In the fall of 2017, all kindergarten students were tested on the DIBELS evaluation.  Municipal Elementary had 49 kindergarten students enrolled at that time with 33% being at benchmark. In May 2018, 97.5% of the kindergarten students were at benchmark or above.

           In the fall of 2017, all 1st Grade students were tested on the DIBELS evaluation.  Municipal Elementary had 51 1st Grade students enrolled at that time with 88% being at benchmark. In May 2018, 58.6% of the 1st Grade students were at benchmark.

In the fall of 2017, all 2nd Grade students were tested on the DIBELS evaluation.  Municipal Elementary had 55 2nd Grade students enrolled at that time with 71% being at benchmark. In May 2018, 71.3% of the 2nd Grade students were at benchmark.

In the fall of 2017, all 3rd Grade students were tested on the DIBELS evaluation.  Municipal Elementary had 56 3rd Grade students enrolled at that time with 68% being at benchmark. In May 2018, 81% of the 3rd Grade students were at benchmark.












  1. School-wide Reform Strategies (#3)

ESEA 1114(b)(1)(B)

Refer to items #7 and #15 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

For schools approved by the LEA to operate a school-wide program, required school-wide reform strategies are selected and implemented.

The Community Council consists of the principal, classroom teachers, and parents.  All staff members were invited to participate in developing and implementing the plan.

The Community Council met several times during the school year to review State Core tests and other formative assessments, and surveys.  The Community Council in conjunction with Weber District Title one director decided where our greatest needs are and how the Title I funding could be most beneficial.  It was decided that:

  1. Title I will cover 1.0 FTE for class size reduction and kindergarten full day schedule.  1.0 FTE for a Title I coordinator who will be serving as a child advocate in helping struggling students to succeed, and to fulfill all federal and state level requirements for Title one and Land Trust/community council requirements.
  2. Planners will be used in grades 4-6 to improve communication between teacher, students, and parents.
  3. A Certified teacher with a Reading Endorsement will support teachers, students, and parents.  She will be a full time Reading Specialist.

The reading specialist will assist the administrator in:

- Training and scheduling school volunteers and aides who work with students on a regular basis

- Teaming and scheduling integrated learning opportunities

- Test preparation and coordination

- Working with teachers in a coaching model to improve literacy instruction

  1. Small reading groups will be used in grades K through sixth grades.
  2. The “Imagine Learning” program will be provided for grades K-1 for all students and grades 2-3 as an intervention for those students testing intensive under the DIBELS evaluation.
  3. Time will be provided for vertical teaming and observation of colleagues within the school.  Municipal Elementary is actively involved in Professional Learning Communities and is working to continually improve these PLC meetings.
  4. Provide in-service training for staff in reading strategies, writing process, and math best practice instruction.
  5. E.S.L. aide will provide supports to LEP students.
  6. Students will be provided with free books for reading at home.  This will be done through a partnership with our PTA, business partners, Title one funds, and school reading program. An Eagle’s nest lending library will also be made available during summer so that students can come and ‘check out’ books for reading during the summer when the Municipal Elementary library is closed.
  7. Aides assist students during small groups, and individually to improve math fluency, and math problem solving skills.
  8. Imagine Learning Math Facts fluency is used to increase math fluency in grades 2-6.  This program allows teachers to see where students are at the beginning of the year and their improvement.
  9. Math manipulatives are readily available to teachers to help make learning more hands on.

Schoolwide Reform Goals and Strategies Form

(Complete one page for each goal.)

Schoolwide Goals: Goals must be directly related to the results of the comprehensive needs assessment and directly tied

to the Utah State Core Curriculum.  Goals must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-based (SMART).

Goal

Academic Goals

1.     Students who take the DIBELS will improve by an average of 30% from beginning of the year to the end of year test on their composite score.

2.     Students will increase their score on the district math SLO/SGA test by an average of 65%. (Student Learning Objectives, Student Growth Assessment)

Strategies

Positive Behavior Support, Explicit Instruction, Tier 3 Instructional Model, Goal Setting, Peer Assisted Learning Strategies, and Professional Learning Communities.

Scientifically Based

Research Support

Archer, A.L., Hughes, C.A. (2011) Explicit Instruction Effective and Efficient Teaching. New York, The Guilford Press.

Whitaker, T. (2004) What Great Teachers Do Differently: 14 Things That Matter Most. Larchmont, NY.

Smith, R., Johnson, Ml, Thompson, K.D. (2011) Data, Our GPS: Educational Leadership.

Dweck, C. (2010) Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.

Eaker, R., DuFour, R., DuFour, R., (2002) Getting Started; Reculturing Schools to Become Professional Learning Communities. Bloomington, IN.

Hattie, J.; (2012) Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning. New York, NY.

Fisher, D., Frey, N., Hattie, J., (2016) Visible Learning for Literacy: Implementing the Practices that Work Best to Accelerate Student Learning. Thousand Oaks, CA

Marzano, R.J., Pickering, D.J. (2011) The Highly Engaged Classroom. Bloomington, IN

Expected Impact in Core Academic Areas

(How will success be measured on an annual basis?)

End of level  RISE (Readiness Improvement Success and Empowerment) Tests (This test replaces the SAGE test that was used last year for end of level testing.


Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)


We use Beginning, Middle, and End of Year testing progress monitoring with the DIBELS test.

Beginning, Middle, and End of Year testing, with the District Math SLO/SGA tests. (Student Learning Objectives, Student Growth Assessment)

Professional

Development to

Support Strategies

Each year staff members set educational goals and look at  their professional development needs. Based upon the results of the teacher’s goals, and ongoing projects at the school, the professional development for this year will include:

Positive Behavior Support: The staff will continue to review and refine positive behavior support strategies needed to improve student achievement during faculty meetings.

Explicit Teaching: The staff will continue to review and refine explicit teaching strategies to improve the rate of student engagement and student achievement during faculty meetings.

Tier 3 Instructional Model: The staff will continue to review and refine the Tier 3 Instructional model during faculty meetings.

Reading: The staff will continue to receive training in John Hattie’s research on effective instruction as applied to reading instruction.  Information from the district curriculum department will be given to teachers as well as having the opportunity to work with our reading specialist in an instructional coaching situation.

Focused instruction: Teachers will receive instruction in identifying essential learning targets and in backwards instructional design.  They will be focusing on how to implement these ideas in professional learning communities.

Math: The staff will receive training in the Utah Math Core State Standards, as well as how to use the district math curriculum to teach these standards in three different venues.  Every Wednesday there will be either online or face to face trainings put on by Dr. Jennifer Boyer-Thurgood on how to effectively use Essential Learning Targets with the Engage New York math curriculum.   We will be training in faculty meetings and during our professional development days there will be at least 3 hours devoted to math instruction and how to implement Hattie’s research on best practice.

Writing: The staff will continue to receive training in the writing curriculum and how to implement it in the classroom from a master teacher and the reading specialist.

Collaboration Teams: .  Weber School District and Municipal Elementary have been involved in developing and sustaining an active Professional Learning Community Program.  Each grade level team will meet together weekly to focus on curriculum and intervention. This teaming develops collegiality as well as being a communication tool. In May the teachers will have the opportunity to meet in vertical collaboration between grade level teams to help solidify the ELT’s and if there are any concerns where grades can support each other more effectively.


 Technology: Technology in-service is provided as needed to all staff members by one of our Instructional Technology Teachers to support the use of  Ipads and Smartboards. Teachers can request this training by filling in a request form that is available on all teacher desktop computers.

ESL: Strategies for instructing LEP students in the classroom has been presented by our certified ESL teacher during faculty meetings. We will continue to support our ESL students individually and in the classroom.

Teacher to Teacher Share (TTS):  TTS sessions will be provided to allow teachers to share ideas at faculty meetings and to visit one another’s classrooms to improve communication of effective teaching strategies.  This has been done both on Wednesday planning day and in-service days. This is also being incorporated into our Professional Learning Communities Program.


Child Study Teams:  Every Tuesday and Thursday teachers can sign up to meet in a Child Study Team Meeting.  This is where a group of teachers, administrator, speech therapist, counselor, & special education leaders discuss ways to service student’s needs and possible strategies that could help improve learning in the classroom for students who are not responding to Tier one instruction.

Timeline

2018-2019 School Year

Responsible

Parties

District Curriculum Director, Principal, Technology department leaders, Curriculum department leaders, & Teacher leaders who have been assigned to assist with professional development.

Evaluation Process

The principal will conduct consistent drop-in observations in the classrooms to monitor the implementation of the instructional strategies. Teacher summative and formative evaluations and professional goals will be used to help in this process.

  1. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers (#5, #6)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(C)

In school-wide program schools; instruction must be provided by highly qualified staff. Either list the staff on this form or download a copy of the CACTUS Highly Qualified Teacher Report.

Teacher/Staff

Grade level or assignment

Highly Qualified?

Yes              No

Laura (Lita) Moriarty Hilles

Alt K

Y

 

Julie Merrill

K

Y

 

Whitney Greenhalgh

K

Y

 

Nancy Brinton

1st

Y

 

Natalie Hoy  

1st

y

 

Jahnine Harper

2nd

Y

 

Jaclyn Spencer

2nd  

Y

 

Oksana Zapassoff

2nd

Y

 

Krystin Amaya  

3rd

Y

 

Sarah Hone

3rd

Y

 

Sara Hogge

3rd

 

N

Maureen Panganiban

4th

Y

 

Sheri Hardy

4th

Y

 
 

Teacher/Staff

 

Grade level or assignment

Highly Qualified?

Yes                              No

 

Nicole Neal

 

5th

Y

 
 

Cara Dayley

 

5th

Y

 
 

Lanette Stephens

 

6th

Y

 
 

Shaylee Joyner

 

6th

Y

 
 

Chelsea Rasmussen

 

Special Education

Y

 
 

Clarisa Gibson

 

Special Education

Y

 
 

Kevin Chase

 

Administrator

Y

 
 

Jacci Strain

 

Title I Coordinator

Y

 
 

Rachael Barker

 

Counselor

Y

 
 

Mary Farmer

 

Speech/Language

Y

 
 

Kristi Cool

 

Reading Coach

Y

 
 

Kaylene Robinson (Aide)

 

EL

Y

 
 

Ann Pratt

 

Reading aide

Y

 
                   

21 of the 22 teachers at Municipal Elementary are highly qualified.  Each of those 21 teachers has a Bachelor’s degree and is certified by the State of Utah, which meets the requirements under section 1119.  One teacher is under the APT program and if she continues at her current rate will be Highly Qualified by the end of this year. Eleven out of twenty-two teachers have their Master Degrees, two teachers have an ESL endorsement, and one has a reading endorsement. Five teachers are provisional in their first three years of teaching.  All paraprofessionals have met the highly qualified requirements. All paraprofessionals are under the direct supervision of a certified teacher and the principal. Paraprofessionals are receiving regular in-service

  1. Professional Development Plan (#7)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(D)

Refer to item #9 of the Utah Title I Part A. Monitoring Handbook

Describe the professional development necessary to support the strategies. The team must include strategies to ensure that all students are taught by highly qualified teachers.

Professional

Development

Each year staff members are surveyed to determine their professional development needs.  Based upon the results of the survey, needs assessment, and ongoing projects at the school, the professional development for the year will include:

•           Reading: The staff will continue to receive training in John Hattie’s research on effective instruction as applied to reading instruction.  Information from the district curriculum department will be given to teachers as well as having the opportunity to work with our reading specialist in an instructional coaching situation.  Additionally teachers will be receiving training and support with sELA adoption materials.

•          Math: The staff will receive training in the Utah Math Core State Standards, as well as how to use the district math curriculum to teach these standards in three different venues. Teachers were given two days during the summer to collaborate, plan out, and modify lessons in the Engage New York math curriculum.  Aslo, the district is providing ongoing math trainings every Wednesday that teachers can attend. Finally, there will be training in faculty meetings and professional development days where there will be time devoted to math instruction and how to implement Hattie’s research on best practice.

•           Writing: The staff will continue to receive training in our school wide writing program.

•           Collaboration Teams: The teachers will meet in May for vertical collaboration between grade level teams.  Weber School District and Municipal Elementary have been involved in developing and sustaining an active Professional Learning Community Program.  Each grade level team will meet together weekly for one hour to focus on curriculum and remediation. This teaming develops collegiality as well as being a great communication tool.

•           Technology: Technology in-service is provided to all staff members by one of our Instructional Technology Teachers and district level technology support specialists as needed.

•           ESL: Strategies for instructing LEP students in the classroom has been presented by our certified ESL teacher during faculty meetings. We will continue to support our ESL students individually and in the classroom.

•           Teacher to Teacher Share (TTS):  TTS sessions will be provided to allow teachers to share ideas at faculty meetings and to visit one another’s classrooms to improve communication of effective teaching strategies.  This has been done both on Wednesday planning day and in-service days. This is also being incorporated into our Professional Learning Communities Program.

Scientifically Based Research Support

Muhammad, A., Hollie, S. (2012). The Will to Lead, the Skill to Teach. Bloomington, IN:  The Solution Tree Press

Eaker,R., Keating, J., (2012). Every School Every Team Every Classroom. Bloomington, IN: The Solution Tree Press

Glickman, C. (2002). Leadership for Learning: How to help teachers succeed.  Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Expected Impact

in Core

Academic Areas

Students who take the DIBELS will improve by an average of 30% from beginning of the year to the end of year test.

Students will increase their score on the district math SLO test by an average of 65%.

Budget and

Funding Sources

Title 1 federal funds, Reading Plan, School Land Trust, business partnerships, and district block grant funds

Timeline

Professional Learning Communities held weekly, Faculty Meeting held bi-monthly, district professional development days held bi-annually.

Responsible

Parties

School administrator, District Title I director, school staff, and district curriculum staff

Evaluation

Process (How Will Success Be Measured?)

Faculty survey of what development is needed and was helpful. Classroom observations, teacher evaluations and professional goals




  1. Recruitment and Retention of Highly Qualified Teachers (#8) (Technology, smaller class size, extra PD, collaboration, extended day, summer school) ESEA 1114(b)(1)(E)

Refer to item #10 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

Weber School District works with area universities with undergraduate field experiences, as well as student teaching placement in area schools.  Student teachers are watched and evaluated by Weber District building principals. Exemplary student teachers are offered open contracts for the following school year.  Approximately ten of these open contracts are offered per year.

Provisional teachers are provided a one-on-one mentor during their first three years of teaching.  The district will pay for a substitute for provisional teachers so that they may go and observe other teachers on multiple occasions.

Weber School District has a reputation of congeniality for staff members who work well together and are supportive of each other.   It provides a positive working environment with high levels of motivation, support and encouragement. Good communication is encouraged between colleagues and administration.  All staff members are included in the school family environment and the decision making process.

Individual staff member’s needs are met to ensure quality education for our children. If a person feels a need to learn more about a specific educational topic, then resources are provided for that person (i.e. visits to other schools, legislative monies and professional development). All professional development is designed and implemented by the teachers and driven by individual and school goals.

Teacher evaluation emphasizes professional learning as well as curriculum design and instruction. Evaluative criteria are clear and concise, and evaluations are based on consistent standards of performance and provide immediate feedback.

To encourage the recruitment and retention of highly qualified teachers, Title 1 monies are used to provide current technology in the classroom, e.g. document cameras, projectors, Smart Boards, and robots, STEM, and a 3-D printer.  Teachers in Title 1 schools also have smaller class sizes and have more opportunities for extra professional development and collaboration as well as the opportunity for extended day teaching in after school programs and summer school.Federal assistance programs for undergraduate students that become teachers in a Title I school provide the opportunity for loan forgiveness.

  1. Parent Involvement (#13, #14, #15)ESEA 1114 (b)(2(B)ii ESEA 1114(b)(2)(B)iv

Refer to items #16 and #17 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

  • Describe the processes used to involve parents in the development of the school wide planning process. Copies of communications that were mailed or sent home, agenda with roll signatures, meeting notices, meeting minutes, etc. will be maintained on the School Title I website.

Parents will be provided assessment and progress information as listed below.  An interpreter will be provided to those parents that are in need.

Community Council and PTA meetings- parents and teachers are informed of progress in the September community council

meeting, and in the annual PTA meeting where the budget is approved.  

Student Education Plan (S.E.P.)

S.E.P.’s are held during regularly scheduled conferences.  Parents, students and teachers meet to discuss and formulate an educational plan to meet the needs of every child at Municipal Elementary.  S.E.P’s also provide an opportunity for parents, students and teachers to provide feedback and share information in all areas. Reading and Math results are reviewed each fall by the classroom teacher.  At the fall conference the teacher has the responsibility of reviewing RISE results with parents.  RISE formative assessment was implemented spring of 2018 to replace SAGE.

Parent/Teacher Conferences

District scheduled conferences are held each fall and spring. Teachers will provide written documentation to parents on the academic progress of their students.  Written documentation will include informal reading and math assessment information. The reading specialist will be available at Parent Teacher Conferences to provide information on progress of students and services available.  The teacher will schedule additional conferences, if necessary. All Title one documents are available for review at a table in the front of the school by our reading specialist at Back to School Night, Parent Conferences in October and again in February.

Ongoing Communication

Website, home notes, monthly newsletters, Joomla emails, PTA FaceBook page,  telephone calls, progress reports, and planners will be used to communicate student progress and events happening at the school.  The PTA and school produce a newsletter for parents that is sent home approximately bi-monthly.

Important Forms & Information

Through cooperation with the district and other schools, priority information and forms will be provided in Spanish.  A list of available interpreters will be maintained in the office of the school. We have two staff members who speak fluent Spanish.

  • Describe how school-wide plans will be made available to parents and the public in an understandable and uniform format.

Based on feedback from the parent survey, the following strategies will be used at Municipal Elementary to increase parental involvement:

S.E.P.’s will be held in conjunction with parent teacher conferences held 2 times during the school year. (October and January) Back to school night will be held in August for parents and students where parents will have an opportunity to pick up school materials and information sheets and meet with teachers.  All programs will be outlined at this time. The Student/Parent/Teacher Compact will also be presented and signed

Information concerning Title I Programs, S.E.P.’s and other programs will be posted on the website and available to parents in paper form as needed.  The school calendar/newsletter will also help to increase parent and community involvement.

Title I progress reports will be provided in conjunction with parent teacher conferences and available in the office at all times.

Parents will have access to the district portal via the internet, which will provide current demographics, lunch accounts, and grades for each student.

Daily planners (grades 4-6) are used to build communication between home and school.

Family activity nights are scheduled to draw more parent involvement in the school. Some of the activities will include: Writing, Reading, Math, Project Lead the Way events, School Play, and music presentations etc.

Parent workshops will be held dealing with phonics techniques, reading skills, math skills, discipline, technology and self-esteem.  These will be held at our Parent nights and through the Family Resource Center at Club Heights Elementary.

A variety of other supports will be provided to parents through the cone Parent Literacy & Support Center at Club Heights Elem.

  • Identify the parent involvement strategies that the school will use to involve parents.

Identify how the school will fulfill each of the following Title I parent involvement requirements.

Person responsible

and timeline

   

With input from parents, PTA, teachers, and community partners develop a school policy for parental involvement. Create an environment of cooperation and collaboration that encourages parental involvement.

Responsible: Principal, Teacher leadership team, PTA, Community Council.

Timeline: Ongoing

Convene an annual meeting for parents to explain the Title I program and inform parents of their right to be involved. Newsletter and school handouts.  Title I information is on the school website.

Responsible: Principal, Teachers

Timeline: Back To School Night, Family Night, PTA meetings, Community Council meetings

Offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening and provide, as appropriate, support from Title I funds for parent participation, homework options, or home visits, as such relate to parental involvement.

Responsible: Principal, Resource, Partners, Teachers, Title I Coordinator, Counselor

Timeline: Ongoing

Involve parents in an organized, ongoing and timely way in the planning, review and improvement of school parental involvement policy and Title I programs.

Responsible:Principal

Community Council

Timeline:Quarterly or as needed

Provide parents timely information about the Title I program, school and student performance profiles, curriculum and assessment information, opportunities to meet with other parents, and timely responses to parents’ suggestions. Electronic information and notes home on Title I programs and events.

Responsible:Principal, Title I Coordinator, Teachers

SEP Conferences, progress reports, and daily planners

Newsletter

Website

Timeline:Ongoing

Jointly develop with parents district and school personnel a school-parent compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student achievement.

Responsible:Principal, Teachers Community Council

Timeline: Done Sept 18, 2018

Consistently build the capacity of parents, the school, and the community for involvement that will lead to improved student achievement. Encourage parents to come to school and be involved.  Set a climate that is inviting and friendly.

Responsible: Principal,  Counselor, Teachers, Community Council, PTA,  Parent Resource Center

Timeline: Ongoing

Where possible, provide full opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English proficiency, or with disabilities, by providing information, and school profiles in a language and method so parents understand.

Responsible: Principal, ESL Teacher, Interpreter, Parent Resource Center

Timeline: Ongoing

  1.  Transition from early childhood programs to local elementary school programs (Elementary schools only)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(G)(#9)(Family Resource Center- Birch Creek Elementary, Title 1 Preschool- Midland Elementary)

Refer to item #11 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

In schoolwide program schools, there is clear evidence of transition activities between early childhood programs/home and the local elementary school.

Description of communication

Weber School District has developed a program for pre-school programs and has offered training and support for local pre-schools.  Through the parent library and the Parent Resource Center, parents will be provided with instruction in early childhood skills. Municipal also offers a jump start program made available for all new kindergarten students in early August. All preschool students that will attend Municipal Elementary are notified about kindergarten registration and orientation prior to kindergarten entrance.  In the spring, kindergarten registration forms are filled out by parents, followed by orientation activities consisting of student and parents meeting the school staff. Before the first week of kindergarten in the fall, students attend with parents for a 30-minute appointment, which provides a wonderful opportunity for student, parent, and teacher to meet on a one-on-one basis.

Description of collaboration efforts

The special education and the Title 1 Department in Weber School District are working toward a way to provide preschool to those who need it in the area.

Description of transition activities

In the spring, a list of incoming Special Education students is received and the school team, made up of principal, teachers, special education teachers and parents are invited to discuss the students’ needs for the upcoming school year.  This gives the school the opportunity to be prepared to deal with the needs of the child before school begins. Each special education student comes with an individual IEP that is updated and followed.








  1. Decisions regarding the use of assessments  (#1, #11)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(H)

Refer to item #12 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

In school-wide program schools, teachers are included in decisions regarding the use of assessments.

What assessments will be used to measure student progress and inform instruction?

(#1)

Readiness, Improvement, Success, Empowerment (RISE):  Results for grades 3-6 in Reading and Math core test are used to evaluate student progress.

DIBELS (Dynamic Indicator of Early Literacy Skills) Students in grades K-3 will be administered the DIBELS test three times annually to assess their reading skills.


Surveys: Surveys are used as needed for input regarding success and needs of the students, and staff.   These surveys involve, but are not limited to curriculum, safety, communication and relationships.


District Level math SGA tests Students will be given these tests at the beginning of the year and at the end of the year to show growth in learning for that year. These will be used to inform teachers about their ability to teach the CORE concepts and where we may want to spend more time.

Please describe how teachers were included in decisions regarding the use of assessments(#11)

Teacher input was received at faculty meetings, and Child Study Team meetings, and during each grades’ Professional Learning Community regarding the use of assessments for reading and math.  Teachers are using “best practices” and current training to implement programs that show positive results in student achievement. Students K through 6 are given the DIBELS assessment. Additional curriculum and interventions in small groups will be implemented for those students that score in the “some risk and at risk” areas.  The Kindergarten students receive the Early Reading Intervention Program; first grade, Reading For all Learners; second and third grade receive Read Naturally, Journey’s. First grade-Third grade students who score intensive on the DIBELS assessment, receive intervention on the “Imagine Learning” computer based program and Reading Horizons phonics intervention program. These programs are researched based and provide positive results in student achievement.  Monthly progress monitoring is administered to determine student achievement and to make adjustments in the interventions as needed. Math fact tests (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) are also administered on a quarterly basis to each child.

Teachers are given results of RISE data with a breakdown of areas with which students in their classes need more explicit instruction and areas in which teachers need to adjust teaching techniques.  Strategies and ideas on how to strengthen teaching methods are discussed. Teachers also give input as to what services the children receive based on the RISE results as well as teacher recommendations.  With opportunity to review their curriculum and instructional strategies. They will be able to analyze patterns of achievement or non-achievement.

The teacher/parent/student team creates student Education Plans.  Teachers provide information to Title I staff from these SEP’s that may be helpful in planning individual interventions.




  1. Students who experience difficulty mastering academic achievement standards (#10)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(I)

Refer to item #13 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

In school-wide program schools, procedures are in place to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering any of the proficient or advanced levels of academic standards are provided timely and additional assistance.

 

How will the school identify which students experience difficulty in mastering academic standards?

(#18)

Multiple assessments will be used to continually check the progress of students.  Surveys will be used to continue to assess parents and teachers opinion on student progress and attainment of goals.

Informal Reading & Math Assessments

Administered as a pretest to all students K-6

Results will be used to:

    Establish instructional group placement

    Help in instructional planning

    Identify a baseline reading & math level

Quarterly reading and math timings will chart growth

DIBELS testing 3 times a year (Fall, Winter, and Spring) in K-6

DIBELS monthly progress monitoring

Math pre/post chapter test

Administered where applicable, as a pretest to all student at the beginning of a math unit

Results will be used to:

1.       Establish a baseline score

2.       Guide instructional group placement

3.       Help in instructional planning

Administer as a post-test to all students

1.       Adequate progress will be a score of 80% or a minimum increase of 40 percentage points.

2.       Teacher Assessment on Projects and Individual Assignment

3.       Teachers will evaluate projects and individual assignments in terms of student growth.

What interventions will the school provide for students experiencing difficulty in mastering academic standards?

(#10)

To provide effective, timely and additional assistance to students, Title I and classroom

Teachers will alter teaching strategies, adapt curriculum, and reduce teacher to pupil ratio by doing the following:

School paraprofessionals will offer individual and/or small group instruction using materials supplied by the Reading specialist and/or the classroom teacher.

The reading specialist/classroom teacher will individualize a program and work independently or in a small group with students until concepts are mastered.  A variety of instructional methods and published programs and materials will be utilized.

Classroom teacher or reading specialist will contact parents with information and materials to do follow-up work at home with the child.

Additional aide time will be given to students for individual or small group remediation.

To provide effective, timely and additional assistance to students, the classroom teachers will alter teaching strategies, adapt curriculum, and reduce teacher to pupil ratio by doing the following:

Title I paraprofessionals will offer individual/small group instruction using materials supplied by a Title I teacher and/or the classroom teacher.

Classroom teacher will contact parent with information and materials to do follow-up work at home with the child.

When requested, or teacher referred counseling services will be provided to support students in the school process.

Tracking and planners will be used to help facilitate communication between home and school.

How will the school evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen interventions and make adjustments as needed(#19)

Teachers will evaluate the effectiveness of ongoing classroom and individual interventions during team PLC meetings.  Adjustments will be made as needed throughout the year if needed.

In a faculty meeting in May teachers will discuss how effective the interventions have been and make recommendations for improvement for the following year.  

Community council will evaluate in January the effectiveness of the reading and math interventions to determine if we need to continue with the aide time interventions or make changes with how the Land Trust money is being spent.  

At the end of the year our reading specialist and leadership team will evaluate the results of DiBELS testing to determine where our emphasis needs to be next year.





















  1. Coordination of Budgets (Federal, State, Local funds) (#12, #16)

ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(J)

(#14 of Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook)

In school-wide program schools, there is coordination and integration of federal, state, and local services and programs.

Program

Funding

Source

Allocation

Describe how the funding sources will support the school-wide plan.

Title 1

$20,000.00

Substitute salaries, instructional supplies, professional development, instructional equipment, science and math interactive manipulatives, and parent involvement supplies.

Title 1

0.5 FTE

Kindergarten Teacher/For full day Kindergarten

Title 1

0.5 FTE

Teachers/For class size reduction second grade

     
     

Program

Funding

Source

Allocation

Describe how the funding sources will support the schoolwide plan.

School Budget

$21,348.00

Supplies, media center funds, textbooks, reading program, additional aide for interventions

Business Partners

$500.00

school projects, printing supplies and computer supplies, PE, and arts programs.

Reading Plan (HB 312)

$5,758.48

Supplies, staff development, take home books for students, student reading incentives, additional aide time for interventions

USOE Trustlands

39,717.00

Additional aide time for music, and computer lab instruction that allows teachers time for the PLC process.

5775 South 2200 West, Roy, UT | Phone: 801-452-4120| Fax: 801-452-4139